Burglary

The most common way a person commits burglary is by entering a building with the intention of committing theft. For example, if a person enters a store with the intention of stealing an item on display, that person has committed a burglary. Burglary can also be committed by entering vehicles or certain storage areas with the intent to commit theft. A person also commits burglary if he enters any of these areas with the intention of committing any felony. For example, if a person enters a building with the intention of committing felony vandalism, that person has committed a burglary.

In California, burglary is categorized into two degrees. First degree burglary, also known as residential burglary, is when a person enters someone's dwelling (e.g. house, apartment, houseboat, etc.) with the intention of committing theft or any felony. First degree burglary is a felony punishable by two, four, or six years in state prison. It is also a "strike" under the California Three Strikes Law.

All other kinds of burglary are of the second degree. Second degree burglary can be charged either as a misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of a year in jail, or as a felony punishable by sixteen months, two years, or three years in state prison. Second degree burglary is not considered a "strike" under the Three Strikes Law.

The laws and issues surrounding a burglary charge can be quite complex, requiring the expertise of an experienced criminal defense attorney. Do not go to court without consulting with a qualified attorney regarding what issues and defenses may be present in your case. As a former prosecutor and defense attorney who has handled hundreds of burglary cases, Christian Kim has the experience needed to provide an intelligent and aggressive defense.

If you have been charged with burglary, contact our firm so that our attorney, Christian Kim, can help you through the complexities of the criminal justice system.

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